COOLING DARWIN – ONE ‘POP-UP’ AT A TIME!

Wednesday 9th, Aug 2017

You don’t have to have visited the Dry Tropics to know that Darwin can be a very hot city in both the wet and dry seasons. So how do you address such a big issue for the amenity of the City’s residents, visitors and business owners – and where do you start?

One step at a time is the answer.

Starting from a big picture strategy a small initial intervention helps people to understand the issues, why this matters and what could be achieved on a bigger scale.

So, for the CBD Cooling and Revitalising Pop-Up Project in the Darwin CBD two on-street car park bays on Smith Street have been temporarily transformed into a shady alfresco eating and social meeting place.

The pop-up demonstrates how a few simple elements such as trees, gardens, canopy cover and open ventilation can create cool comfortable spaces that will entice people to stop and chat on a city street.

The CLOUSTON Darwin team has been assisting the Property Council NT over the past few months with the planning, design and implementation of the pop up – a first of its kind for Darwin – and last week it was all hands-on-deck helping with construction.

The pop-up created immediate interest amongst the community with the adjoining café enjoying some brisk trade on Day 1!

The CLOUSTON team sees this as a timely initiative in promoting the important conversation about urban cooling in our cities and the ways to address the challenges of urban heat island effect – one step at a time.

 

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Picture: Hamish Stephens (centre) from CLOUSTON pictured with the ‘Pop-Up’ team and the Lord Mayor of Darwin at the opening of the CBD Cooling and Revitalising Pop-Up Project.

 

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CLOUSTON’s Darwin Office Wins 2016 Jury Prize in My Park Rules Competition

Monday 16th, May 2016

Some exciting news for CLOUSTON yesterday was the announcement that Alice Outcomes, an innovative senior students college in Alice Springs, has won national recognition for its self-help initiative for improving the school’s grounds and social environment. Alice Outcomes’ entry in the national competition My Park Rules, was awarded the 2016 Jury Prize alongside the National Winner, Marrickville Public School in Sydney, from a field of nearly 100 entries submitted by schools right around Australia.

 

We are delighted for Alice Outcomes, not only because CLOUSTON were the community’s design and technical assistants in giving a professional Landscape Architecture touch to their Finals entry, but for the added momentum the award brings to the real object here – getting the project built. We were convinced from the outset the project was a winner and we are pleased the National Jury so clearly agreed.  They singled the project out for the award precisely because they are as keen as Alice Outcomes to see the concept realized, a prime objectives of the competition and its sponsors’ support.

 

My Park Rules itself emanates from the  program  202020 Vision, an initiative of a group of creative organizations that includes The Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (AILA),  its overarching aim being to “create 20% more and better green space by 2020.” As a competition for stimulating community creativity, it reaches out to all Australian schools and kindergartens, inviting their ideas for improving a local park, their playground  and the schools environment.  This year the field of 100 entries exhibited online generated  30,000 votes for a community favorite . One Finalist chosen from each State and Territory was teamed up with a Landscape Architect to develop their concept, and these were scrutinized by a Jury of eminent professionals and public figures including Lucy Turnbull AO, Josh Byrne, Sacha Coles, Tonia Gray, Mary Jevons, Kylie Legge, and Nick Forostenko.

 

CLOUSTON’s Darwin office was motivated to support Alice Outcomes , recognizing it as an imaginative education and social engagement program for young people disadvantaged  by their remote location or personal challenges. It aims to provide a secure and supportive environment for students ranging from the ages of 16 to 25 to accomplish and re-build self-confidence, and then go on to further education and employment. While classroom and teaching resources at Alice Outcomes are fine, the grounds of the college are far from it – little purposeful structure, user comfort, recreational opportunity or engaging character. The award winning concept reverses all that  – proposing tree shaded outdoor learning spaces, student break-out areas, discrete counseling spaces, play areas for the kids of young parents attending Alice Outcomes, vegetable gardens and group picnic areas. As a space transformed to encourage social interaction and pride of place, this park can contribute to transforming peoples’ lives.  That’s an outcome reflecting one of the fundamental principles of design for CLOUSTON – creating landscape with social purpose.

 

Congratulations Alice Outcomes !

 

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Latest – likes and links

Wednesday 9th, Mar 2016

Welcome to our updated website

We hope you enjoy taking the time to find out more about our practice and to explore the many projects on which we have worked, some still in progress and others in active use for more than 25 years.

Many of you will be familiar with the profession of Landscape Architecture and indeed may have worked on projects with CLOUSTON over the years.

For those less familiar with our profession – and that includes many in the broader community – the question often arises “What exactly is Landscape Architecture?”

A good question… and one with no one simple answer, given the broad reach of the profession.

So, as part of a wide ranging questionnaire that we put to our whole team to assist with our website upgrade, we set ourselves the task of completing the following sentence, “What people don’t know about this profession is…”

Here’s a small selection of insights (and humour) from our team…

“Landscape architects are not only designers but planners, innovators, coordinators, mediators, managers, marketers, environmental advocates and more” Jessica Crawford, senior landscape architect, Darwin office

“We work at such varied scales, from whole city strategies to parks and streetscapes down to the finest detail” Tim Sickinger, graduate landscape architect, Sydney office

“There’s more to it than trimming hedges and mowing lawns (actually we never do this), but it seems to be a common perception!” Andrew Pringle, landscape architect, Sydney office

“Great design is sometimes hard to see. It’s not just about aesthetics but also how well things work and how good your experience of a place is. Creating seamless, simple outcomes takes great skill, yet is almost invisible because it simply works” Martin O’Dea, associate director

“We’re not landscapers! There is more to landscape architecture than designing a backyard. We create spaces and experiences, trying to engage people in a space and feel a part of something bigger” Larissa Carpenter, graduate landscape architect, Sydney office

“Landscape architecture is very much concerned with the broader effects that open space has on our society and environment. This profession requires us to have passion for our living environments, and to be able to critically evaluate the way we live” Han Bao, graduate landscape architect, Sydney office

“So much of our work is hidden from view – we are the ninjas of the design profession!” Adele Mammone, graduate architect, Darwin office

“Our work is more about what we understand about people than it is about plants. Our training and experience prepares us for resolving issues around how people use, move through and enjoy places. We are committed to problem solving and creative solutions that will pass the test of time and still have meaning now and in the future” Tony Cox, director, Darwin office

If you’d like to see more of our team’s personal insights as to how they see their chosen profession and their working lives and experiences at CLOUSTON, you might want to check out our staff profiles under ‘People’.